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Technical Committee Report of the 4th Guangzhou Award

2018-09-17

Download 2018 Guangzhou Award TC Report.pdf

 

I. Introduction

The Technical Committee (TC) met in Surabaya from 8 to 12 September, 2018. Its members came from different geographical regions and represent different areas of expertise. It met to select deserving and shortlisted initiatives with a view to enhancing the implementation of sustainable urban development through inspiration and knowledge sharing. It took into consideration the goal of the Guangzhou International Award for Urban Innovation (Guangzhou Award) to recognize innovations in improving the social, economic and environmental sustainability in cities and local governments worldwide and more specifically:

To highlight exemplary models of innovative policies and practices in the local implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the New Urban Agenda;

To motivate cities and local authorities to further promote innovation and to learn from each other;

To improve city governance.

The TC took also into consideration the objectives of the City of Guangzhou to promote the sharing of lessons learned from urban innovations between cities, regions, countries and thematic areas.

The TC wishes to express its appreciation to City of Guangzhou, United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) and World Association of the Major Metropolises (METROPOLIS) for their vision in establishing the Guangzhou Award. The TC also wishes to express its appreciation to ICLEI, C40 and University of 17 Agustus 1945 Surabaya (UNTAG) for their active participation and support to the Award process.

The TC commends the Secretariat for the Guangzhou Award in the way it handled the call for submissions as well as the transparency in its guidelines and processes. It further commends the City of Guangzhou for its intention to invite all 15 shortlisted cities and local governments (hereinafter referred to as cities) to present their initiatives to the International Conference on Urban Innovation as was the case in 2012, 2014 and 2016, and to allow the Jury to make its final decision after the conference.

The 2018 Guangzhou Award received 313 initiatives submitted from 213 cities and from 70 countries and territories, among which 273 submitted from 193 cities and from 66 countries and territories were considered eligible. The TC would like to recognize all submissions for their commendable efforts in making their respective communities more sustainable. Of these 193 cities, 45 were identified as deserving cities. Of these 45 cities, the TC further shortlisted 15 cities representing outstanding initiatives from the 45. These 15 cities are presented in annex including the reasons behind the TC’s choice.


II. Evaluation Process

The TC assessed each submission using the main criteria established by the Guangzhou Award namely:

Innovativeness: the extent to which and the use of knowledge of information has been generated, configured and applied in developing new policies, practices and/or business models to address major urban issues and challenges;

Effectiveness: the extent to which the initiative has achieved or is well on its way to achieve its stated objective(s) and effective social impact;

Context: innovation was also considered within the social, economic and political context of each initiative;

Replicability: the positive demonstration effect and scalability of the initiative in inspiring others to adopt new ideas, policies or practices, including replication in other locations of the city, region or country for greater impact and sustainability;

Significance: strategic importance and cross-cutting nature of the initiative; the importance of the initiative in addressing problems of public concern.

In addition to the above and to the traditional pillars and domains of sustainability (social, economic, environmental, governance and technology), the TC considered the integrated and transformative nature of each initiative.


III. Selection Procedure for the Shortlisted Initiatives

The TC adopted a three-step assessment process.

In its first step, the TC reviewed the initiatives of each geographic region by the respective regional experts. This resulted in a first list of 76 cities. 

In its second step, the members of the TC re-organized into two groups (A and B) with the purpose of identifying 45 deserving cities through extensive shared discussion. Each group came up with a list. The two lists were compared in plenary. Those common to both lists were unanimously admitted to deserving initiatives list. Those remaining were discussed in plenary until consensus on the final list of 45 cities was reached.

In its third step, the members of the TC were re-organized into Groups C and D with the purpose of identifying 15 shortlisted cities. The same methodology was applied and resulted in the shortlist.

The TC prepared a brief for each shortlisted initiative to inform the Jury of the rationale of its selection. These briefs are contained in Annex III.

At its conclusion, the TC finalized the current report. It also presented the results of its deliberations to participants and leaders attending the 7th UCLG ASPAC Congress.


IV. Recommendations of the TC to the Secretariat

The TC appreciates the transparent process and rigorous procedures undertaken for the evaluation of the submissions to the 2018 award. The Technical Committee has the following suggestions on how to improve the Award process. With a significant increase in the number of countries and territories participating in the fourth cycle of the award, the Award will need to plan for the future and the likelihood that more countries and cities will participate. A critical consideration will be to ensure the highest possible quality of submissions. Processes and procedures that could help achieve this objective include:

(a) Regarding submission format 

Ensure that all submissions are eligible, namely that they are being submitted by an appropriate government authority. This can be ensured by explicitly requesting the name of the government authority and the title of the key contact person in the profile;

Place the request for information pertaining to the SDGs as part of the upfront abstract (instead of the current checklist at the back) and request submitters to provide an overview of how one or more SDGs are being addressed;

Have separate questions and sections on “goal and objectives” and “implementation strategy”;

Have separate questions and sections on “partners” and on “benefits to third parties.

Further encourage cities to submit graphic material including one photo, map or chart to be embedded in the core text.

(b) Regarding TC working tools

While all TC members are concerned about the amount of paper used, we were equally divided in our preference to go paperless or to continue working with a limited number of hard copies of the submission material. The TC recommends that for the next session the secretariat provide the 2 options to members and prepare a more limited number of hard copies of the submission material. The recommended format for going paperless is PDF files clustered by region; 

Provide hyperlink or other convenient means of accessing supplementary materials without having to change directories.

(c) Regarding code of conduct: request members of the TC to sign a non-disclosure agreement as part of a simple code of conduct.

V. TC Members (in alphabetical order of last name)

1. Mr. Greg Budworth, Group Managing Director, Compass Housing Services Co Ltd; Vice President, General Assembly of Partners, UN-HABITAT;

2. Mr. Luigi Cipolla, Senior Urban Planner, EGIS International in Indonesia; member, ISOCARP (2007- );

3. Mr. Ali El-Faramawy, Professor, Architectural Design, Department of Architecture & Urban Planning, Faculty of Engineering, Ain Shams University; Executive Director, Informal Settlement Development Facility (ISDF), Office of the Prime Minister, Government of Egypt (2009-2013); Senior Human Settlement Officer, Regional Office for Africa and Arab States, UN-HABITAT (2007-2008);

4. Ms. Kirstin Miller, Executive Director, Eco-City Builders;

5. Mr. Lookman Oshodi, Jury Member, Pilot Projects (2018-2020), METROPOLIS; Project Director, Arctic Infrastructure (AI);

6. Ms. Wandia Seaforth, Former Chief, Best Practices, UN-HABITAT;

7. Ms. Elisa Silva, Director, Enlace Arquitectura; Senior Advisor, CAF-Development Bank of Latin American; Consultant, UN-HABITAT; Professor, Simon Bolívar University; Visiting Professor, Harvard University;

8. Mr. Enrique R. Silva, Associate Director, Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) program, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy (LILP); Chair, Technical Committee, 2018 Guangzhou International Award for Urban Innovation;

9. Mr. Anthony G.O. Yeh, Chan To-Hann Professor in Urban Planning and Design, Chair Professor of Department of Urban Planning and Design, Director of GIS Research Centre, University of Hong Kong; Academician, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Academician, Academy of Social Sciences, UK;

10. Ms. Belinda Yuen, Research Director, Lee Kuan Yew Centre for Innovative Cities, Singapore University of Technology & Design; elected President, Singapore Institute of Planners (2005-2008);

11. Mr. Carlos E. Zaballa, Professor, University of Buenos Aires; Special Consultant for supporting G20 Engagement Groups, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Argentina; Member, Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF), United Nations (2011-2014).


VI. Members of the Secretariat

1. Mr. Nicholas You, Director, International Programs and Partners, Guangzhou Institute for Urban Innovation

2. Ms. Yinghong Zhou, Deputy Secretary General, Guangzhou Award Secretariat

3. Ms. Shulin Tan, Manager, International Programs and Partners, Guangzhou Award Secretariat

4. Mr. Roger Lawe, Manager, Branding and Communications, Guangzhou Award Secretariat

NEXT PAGE: List of 15 Shortlisted Cities

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List of 15 Shortlisted Cities

(In alphabetical order of coutries)


1. Santa Fe, Argentina

Santa Fe’s Western Urban Natural Reserve: Embracing the Hydroclimatic Risks

2. Sydney, Australia

Green Square: From a Rich Industrial Past to a Vibrant, Sustainable and Connected Community

3. Salvador, Brazil

(1) Caravana da Mata Atlântica

(2) Environmental Recovery Program of the Canabrava Park

4. Repentigny, Canada

A City for All

5. Wuhan, China

The "Rebirth" of Urban Waste Dump – Ecological Restoration Bridging the Social Gaps 

6. Yiwu, China

Innovating Foreign Service Initiatives to Build a Harmonious and Integrated Yiwu

7. Santa Ana, Costa Rica

Santa Ana en Cleta: Active Mobility and Women Empowerment

8. Surabaya, Indonesia

Public Participatory in 3R Waste Management for Better Surabaya

9. Milan, Italy

Milan Food Policy: An Innovative Framework for Making Urban Food System More Sustainable, Inclusive

10. Guadalajara, Mexico

Citizen-Led Metropolitan Coordination of Guadalajara

11. Utrecht, Netherlands

Localizing the SDGs through Multi-Stakeholder Partnerships

12. Kazan, Russia

Innovative Social and Economic Development of the City of Kazan

13. eThekwini, South Africa

(1) Incremental, Participatory, Programmatic Informal Settlement Upgrading Programme; and

(2) Partnerships with the Private Sector to Achieve Sustainable Sanitation Service Provision

14. Mezitli, Turkey

Mezitli Women Producers Market

15. New York, United States

Global Vision | Urban Action


NEXT PAGE: List of 30 Deserving Cities

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List of 30 Deserving Cities

(In alphabetical order of countries)


1. Brussels-Capital Region, Belgium

Canal Plan: An Innovative Planning Approach for the Brussels-Capital Region

2. Dangbo, Benin

Valorization of Water Hyacinth in Compost

3. Federal District, Brazil

Acting to Transform: Social Control and Transparency

4. Vancouver, Canada

Northeast False Creek Plan

5. Vaudreuil-Dorion, Canada

I AM…/Citizen Involvement, Culture and Sustainable Development

6. Guangzhou, China

Guangzhou 12345 Government Service Hotline

7. Nanning, China

Developing Beautiful South Pastoral Complex and Narrowing Urban-Rural Gap

8. Hong Kong, China

T Park

9. Bogota, Colombia

(1) Coexistence and Respect for Difference: A Social Inclusion of the Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Transgender

(2) www.sexperto.co: Digital Platform for Information on Reproductive Health and Access to Health Service

(3) Urban Transformations for Inclusion

10. Curridabat, Costa Rica

Date Tu Casa (Give Yourself a House)

11. Senftenberg, Germany

The Lusatian Lakeland – Transformation with Structure, from a Mining Region to a Lake Landscape

12. Isfahan, Iran

Specialized Hospital of Sick Buildings (Sustainable Doctor of Sick Buildings)



13. Eilat, Israel

Eilat Solar

14. Kfar Saba, Israel

Meeting a Common Challenge: Optimizing Energy Practices and Behaviors

15. Bologna, Italy

Civic Imagination: Engaging Communities for a More Inclusive and Sustainable City

16. Alor Gajah, Malaysia

Melaka World Solar Valley (MWSV)

17. Seberang Perai

Malaysia Seberang Perai Upcycle Park

18. Cuautla, Mexico

La Perseverancia: Solid Waste to Generate Electricity with a Social Benefit in Cuautla

19. Ramallah, Palestine

weRamallah: Smart City Initiative

20. Bucheon, Republic of Korea

Climate-Resilient City, Bucheon

21. Busan, Republic of Korea

Gamcheon Culture Village’s City Rejuvenation Project

22. Seoul, Republic of Korea

Seoul’s People-Centric Urban Regeneration Project as a Model of Sustainable Urban Growth

23. Krasnoyarsk, Russia

Mayor's Labor Unit

24. Ufa, Russia

(1) Center of Temporary Accommodation (Emergency Fund)

(2) Interdepartmental System of Preventing Adolescent Suicides

(3) Information and Control Center 

25. Singapore, Singapore

Master Planning of Punggol Eco-Town

26. Catalonia, Spain

smartCATALONIA, Scaling the Smart City Concept to a Regional Initiative

27. Zaragoza, Spain

100 Ideas Zaragoza

28. Umea, Sweden

The Gendered City Tour – Challenging Power in Cities

29. Eskisehir, Turkey

Eskisehir Urban Development Project

30. Denver, United States

Solving Climate Change and Creating Green Spaces


NEXT PAGE: Summaries of the 15 Shortlisted Cities’ Initiatives

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Summaries of the 15 Shortlisted Cities’ Initiatives

 

1. Santa Fe, Argentina

Santa Fe’s Western Urban Natural Reserve: Embracing the Hydroclimatics Risks

The Argentine city of Santa Fe, population 400,000, developed an innovative approach to planning and risk management as a response to a devastating flood in 2015. A community-led program to massive flooding evolved into the Western Urban Natural Reserve project. Its objective is to transform 142 hectares of reservoirs into a protected natural area that is also incorporated into a system of green public spaces. It directly benefits more than 80,000 residents. It promotes environmental education and awareness and the improvement of quality of life. Also, it promotes economic and social development through labor training activities, the incorporation of informal waste collectors, the creation of community orchards and the construction of nurseries. The initiative is innovative because it integrates education, poverty reduction, social inclusion with water, land and natural resources management. The environmental dimension is foregrounded as the key driver for risk management processes and the socio-economic improvement of the community.

The TC recommends this project for consideration to the Guangzhou Award because of its comprehensive approach considering green space, watershed management, and the role of ecological systems in lieu of hard infrastructure in the formation of an urban space and the mitigation of risk. The TC also commends the city for its citizen engagement in the design and advancement of the initiative.

This initiative is highly relevant to SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe resilient and sustainable and SDG 15: Improving resource efficiency, mitigation and adaptation to climate change, resilience to disasters and implement holistic disaster risk management.


2. Sydney, Australia,

Green Square: From a Rich Industrial Past to a Vibrant, Sustainable and Connected Community

Sydney is Australia’s largest city with a population of 5 million people, while the municipality of the City of Sydney has a resident population of 233,217 over an area of approximately 30 square kilometers.

Green Square will be Australia’s largest urban renewal project to date, to be supported by participating public and non-public stakeholders and aims to be the most livable, resilient, lively, walkable, accessible, sustainable and unique area of the city for the benefit of its estimated 61,000 residents. It will host a socially and economically thriving town-centre, markets, festivals and world-class sporting and community facilities. It is supported by sustainable mobility infrastructure; a transit-oriented, high density development aiming to minimize its environmental footprint. Public policy and government funding for the project is committed and the private finance, legal, technical and logistical infrastructure strategy is well advanced, as is the monitoring and evaluation methodology to assess the project’s performance against a range of social, economic, urban and environmental indicators that aim to show that high density living can be compatible with high health and well-being outcomes for residents. Utilizing value-capture and public-private partnership approach, its economic sustainability is well supported and will transform the unused, flood-prone, swamp and other disused land while remaining proximate to a broader economic area and aims to produce 21,000 employment opportunities and Australia’s largest storm water harvesting and treatment scheme.

The Technical Committee were impressed by the holistic approach to innovation, scale and transferability to the project and notes that the successful implementation of the project will deliver outcomes consistent with the SDG 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all ages; SDG 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable education and promote life-long learning opportunities for all; SDG 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all; and SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.


3. Salvador, Brazil

(1) Caravana da Mata Atlântica

(2) Environmental Recovery Program of the Canabrava Park

The Brazilian city of Salvador, population 3 million, presents two linked projects that address environmental protection, remediation, reforestation, and education. It is advanced by the SECIS Sustainable City and Innovation Secretary to address the vulnerable situation of one of the most sensitive biodiversity locations in the world currently threatened by growing urbanization. In order to reverse this scenario, the “Caravana da Mata Atlântica” (a mobile classroom) was created with the purpose of encouraging greater awareness of the importance of preserving green spaces and environmental preservation. It is a holistic and comprehensive environmental protection project, that engages youth and targets traditionally marginalized and at-risk communities most affected by deforestation. A specialized team of the SECIS develops and implements projects such as tree planting activities, together with the community. Other components of the project are the use of sludge as fertilizer in the reforestation process, and the conversion of a landfill into a public park.

The TC recognizes value in the initiative because of its engagement with different partners including universities, and elementary schools. It shows a capacity to be collaborative and flexible in order to advance the project´s higher goals. It demonstrates the ability to readdress harmful urban development through a comprehensive campaign of reforestation and the promotion of public space.

This initiative is highly relative to SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe resilient and sustainable and SDG 15: Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss.


4. Repentigny, Canada

A City for All

Repentigny is an off-island suburb of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. With a population of approximately 84,000, it is the home of many cultural festivities. 

“A City for All” is a refreshing and exciting three-initiative proposal wrapped under one banner: 

The Citizens and Families initiative connects citizens and municipal staff with information quickly and effectively, a key characteristic of a smart city. 

The Youth initiative focuses on a multimedia lab housed in the city’s library, providing access to digital technologies focusing on creativity and expression. More than 18,000 teenagers using the facility since its opening. 

The Vulnerable People initiative provides assistance to citizens by telephone or the web linking to a wide range of social and community resources. To date, the data have shown that 30% of requests for assistance were in relation with basic needs: food, shelter and material assistance, and 67% of the vulnerable persons were women. 

Importantly, these initiatives are generating insights and data that will be used for future planning and development policies and goals. 

The TC applauds the City of Repentigny, Canada for its broad vision and demonstrated actions to develop an inclusive city at a human scale and to enable innovation and creativity. 

This proposal most strongly correlates with SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe resilient and sustainable; SDG 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable education and promote life-long learning opportunities for all; SDG 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls; and SDG 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all ages.


5. Wuhan, China

The "Rebirth" of Urban Waste Dump – Ecological Restoration Bridging the Social Gaps

Wuhan has a population of 10,890,000, a land area of 8,569 sq. km., and a population density of 78,787/sq. km. This innovation transforms one of the largest landfills in Asia, Jinkou Landfill in Wuhan, to be the most charming recreational park and ecological garden.

The restoration of Jinkou Landfill and the polluted Zhanggong Dyke solved the ecological and urban problem that have troubled Wuhan for decades. It created a 50.5 km long ecological belt, covering an area of over 170 sq. km. It reduces pollution and links up the once polluted Zhanggong Dyke to provide an urban forest park for pedestrians and bicyclists. Part of the site was used for the China International Garden Expo in 2015-2016. This project has made the 14 adjacent communities and the lives of 400,000 people more livable, closing inequalities in the city. The project involves government departments as well as experts from 82 cities in China and 12 countries. This is the largest application of aerobiotic technology for landfill remediation and the biggest ecological bridge in China. It also uses an innovative way of crowd sourcing in raising funds in addition to the traditional way of funding the project. It reduces inequalities and promotes social cohesion of nearby citizens by drastically improving their living environment. People has been mobilized to participate in the project.

The Technical Committee was impressed by the scale and impacts of the project and the innovative ways of implementing it. Other cities can learn from this project on how to turn and link polluted landfills and waterways into parks and pedestrian walkways and bicycle lanes, turning “gray belt” into “green belt” for improving the quality of life the city.

This initiative encompasses SDG 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all; SDG 9: Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation; SDG 10: Reduce inequality within and among countries; and SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.

 

6. Yiwu, China

Innovating Foreign Service Initiatives to Build a Harmonious and Integrated Yiwu

The City of Yiwu (population: 2.2 million; population density: 2024 people per square km) in China is a major wholesale consumer goods and e-commerce centre in the country and the world. It is ranked as the world’s largest wholesale market of consumer goods, exporting to over 200 countries. Every year, about 500,000 business people from overseas visit Yiwu while over 13,000 of them reside in Yiwu. Against the growing number of international people in the city, Yiwu has since 2016 implemented a suite of inclusive and innovative strategies to promote inclusion and sense of belonging including among overseas business people.

The strategies cover a wide range, from business to culture including the development of a first-in-China mediation of foreign-related business disputes by foreigners for foreigners, a one-stop service for all international trade examination and approval transactions, an international family programme to strengthen communication and community building between local and foreign residents, and the issue of a foreign merchant card to help foreigners access public services that are provided to local Chinese, among others. The vision is to create a good business and living environment for both local and foreign residents, in particular, to promote mutual understanding and a better sense of integration. Yiwu has taken the bold measure of improving the living environment for foreigners as the yardstick to measure its improvement in living environment for all residents. 

The Technical Committee commends Yiwu on its forward-looking and all-inclusive approach towards integrating its diverse international community. In addressing the needs and living environment of the growing international population, Yiwu is highlighting what might be done towards achieving SDG 10 (Reduce inequality within and among countries) and SDG 16 (Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions for all) while promoting economic prosperity in a rapidly globalizing society.


7. Santa Ana, Costa Rica

Santa Ana en Cleta: Active Mobility and Women Empowerment

The San Jose (Costa Rica) suburb of Santa Ana, population 57,000, has been shortlisted for its program, Santa Ana en Cleta, a project dedicated to the empowerment of Santa Ana's local population by teaching women how to ride a bike and how to use it as a means of transport. The initiative is considered a step towards the development of the “Active and Sustainable Mobility” program for the city of Santa Ana. The mobility program combines three specific areas: the empowerment of women, sustainable mobility and the strengthening of communities. The overall objective is to transform the mobility and road culture of the city of Santa Ana. The first stage of the project is focused on ways to encourage women, in particular within vulnerable communities, to use the bicycle as a means for personal and economic development. The project also seeks to improve the quality of the urban environment, citizen well-being, health indicators, the recovery of public spaces, as well as and the right to use the city.

The TC recommends the project for the Guangzhou Award for its focus on the promotion of alternative modes of transportation for women and the emancipatory potential of increased bicycle use. The program has a commendable educational program that not only links mobility to personal development, but also demonstrates ways that women can turn the bicycle into an accessible and dignified mode of daily transportation. Half of the world could benefit from this approach to women’s mobility and inclusion.

This initiative is highly relative to SDG 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls and SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.


8. Surabaya, Indonesia

Public Participatory in 3R Waste Management for Better Surabaya

Surabaya is Indonesia’s second largest city and the capital of East Java Province with a population of 3.3 million and a population density close to 10,000 people per square kilometer. Against a background of increasing waste and the degradation of social, human health and environmental outcomes, the innovations contained within the participatory 3R waste management impressed the Technical Committee. 

Firstly, the breadth and depth of community engagement striving towards the program becoming a social movement was esteemed. 

Secondly, the strong commitment to adopting international best-practice and technology in creating an economically sustainable waste management, monitoring and reporting system was also observed. 

Finally, the Committee were also impressed by areas of uncommon innovation, for example: the ability of residents to pay for their transit needs in empty plastic bottles, was lauded. It is hoped that the ongoing change process will eventually disincentivize the use of plastic bottles as the program-movement develops in the future but recognized 3R’s contribution to the SDG 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all ages; SDG 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all; SDG 7: Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all; and SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.


9. Milan, Italy

Milan Food Policy: An Innovative Framework for Making Urban Food System More Sustainable, Inclusive

Located in northern Italy, Milan is the second most populous city in the country after Rome with a population of approximately 1,300,000 and population density of 7533 people per square kilometre. The city’s primary sources of prosperity include trade, tourism, and the creative industry.

Milan’s submission, “Milan Food Policy,” is an innovative planning strategy integrating and implementing a “Food Cycle System” throughout the city. Also importantly, the initiative is strongly linking to social goals of improving health and well-being of citizens. To date, the policy has generated more than 40 initiatives related to reuse, recycling waste food and reducing food miles. The policy initiative additionally cooperates with other international organizations, including EUROCITIES Working Group Food, the EU Platform for Food Losses and Food Waste and the C40 Food System Network.

A key innovation in the “Milan Food Policy” initiative is a new model of urban governance which is based on an integrated cross-sectoral approach between public agencies, social organizations, and the private sector.

The Technical Committee recognizes the issue presented as innovative for the Italian and European context. They appreciate the efforts in scaling the project through a holistic and integrated approach while stimulating local awareness, building public-private partnerships, and aligning municipal policies to SDG indicators.

The project facilitates the exchange of knowledge through community, local organization and international partners. The project emphasizes SDG 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture and SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.


10. Guadalajara, Mexico

Citizen-Led Metropolitan Coordination of Guadalajara

The Mexican State of Jalisco and the 9 municipalities comprising the metropolitan area of Guadalajara, population 4.5 million, decided to take a metropolitan approach to planning in lieu of the traditional scheme of fragmented planning and governance by individual municipalities. This planning reform was formalized into an institute called IMEPLAN (Metropolitan Institute of Planning), the first one of its kind for Mexico, and a rare example across Latin America. The central idea of IMEPLAN is to engage its citizens, experts and municipalities into participatory planning process at the metropolitan scale through collaborative roundtables, workshops and an educational curriculum. The activities encourage all stakeholders to imagine, innovate and plan at a metropolitan scale. It is focused on reducing the negative impacts of unplanned urban development. Part of the initiative’s merits was that it overcame traditional political forces that undermine metropolitan governance. The collaborative approach to envisioning IMEPLAN resulted in the participation of 9 municipalities and the passage of legislation that established the metropolitan body.

The TC recommends the project for the Guangzhou Award as a rare example of a community-led creation of a metropolitan authority charged with the planning and coordination of the city region. Even though the initiative is relatively new, it has gained traction in a short period of time with a strong focus on controlling sprawl.

This initiative is highly relevant to SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable and SDG 12: Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns.


11. Utrecht, Netherlands

Localizing the SDGs through Multi-Stakeholder Partnerships

The City of Utrecht, Netherlands, with a population of approximately 345,000, is the capital and most populous city in the province, and the fourth largest city in the Netherlands. Its ancient city centre features buildings and structures dating back to the High Middle Ages.

Utrecht is using the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a framework for local development to become a “Global Goals City”. The city is activating and cooperating with local stakeholders and connecting local initiatives and expertise with international developments. 

In essence, Utrecht is localizing SDG indicators to measure and track its own public and private development performance. An integrated, interdisciplinary and multi-stakeholder approach will ensure that healthy citizens live in a healthy environment and work in a healthy economy. The effort is hinged on raising local awareness, stimulating SDG-based local strategies, facilitating the exchange of knowledge, building public-private partnerships, and aligning municipal policies to SDG indicators.

The Technical Committee applauds the Utrecht’s effort and an all-encompassing framework for sustained action and the health of citizens, a prosperous future and effective urban management.

Utrecht’s initiative most strongly aligns with SDG 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all ages and SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.


12. Kazan, Russia

Innovative Social and Economic Development of the City of Kazan

The city of Kazan has a population of approximately 1,200,000 and is the sixth most populous city in Russia.

Kazan is addressing critical challenges of social and economic development through three progressive, innovative and pro-active initiatives.

The “Embracing Diversity” initiative celebrates Kazan’s multi-cultural and multi-ethnic cultural heritage. As a central hub connecting these diverse communities, “The House of Friendship of Nations” not only provides offices, libraries, conferences and concert facilities, but has also developed an internet portal bringing together the multitude of diverse associations throughout the city and region. The initiative ensures co-existence and tolerance to achieve peace and harmony, civil identity of minorities, and effective integration of migrants. 

The “Environmental Development” initiative ensures universal access to safe, inclusive and accessible green parks and gardens.

The “Healthy City” initiative provides pathways to healthy food for children and builds healthy lifestyles by increasing citizen’s exposure to sports culture, builds sports facilities, and modernizes healthcare facilities. 

The Technical Committee recognizes and commends these evolutionary initiatives which underpin social and economic development by harmonizing diverse populations, providing a sustainable environment and building a strong citizen base.

The initiative corresponds to SDG 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all ages; SDG 4: Ensure inclusive and equitable education and promote life-long learning opportunities for all; SDG 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable; and SDG 16: Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions for all.


13. eThekwini, South Africa

(1) Incremental, Participatory, Programmatic Informal Settlement Upgrading Programme 

(2) Partnerships with the Private Sector to Achieve Sustainable Sanitation Service Provision

eThekwini is a South African city of about 3,900,000 people with growth rate of 1.4% and population density of 1,523 people per square kilometer over an area of 2,556 square kilometer. It has comparative strength in industry, trade, tourism, creative industry, finance, manufacturing and transportation.

More than 220,000 households in eThekwini live in informal settlements characterized by overcrowding; disasters including fires and floods; poor access to basic services including water, sanitation, electricity and emergency access. In response to these challenges, eThekwini Municipality, is implementing two ambitious initiatives, informal settlement upgrading and partnerships with the private sector to achieving sanitation solutions.

The upgrading programme is a solution incorporating social and economic opportunities that transform settlements into truly livable and sustainable neighbourhoods. With focus on urban infrastructure upgrading and job creation opportunities, the initiative will benefit 70,000 households within 6 years. The in-situ settlements upgrading initiative conforms proportionally to the Sustainable Development Goal 11 (Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable) as it will enable residents to access social amenities like education and health services and contributes to social cohesion, spatial justice and urban integration.

The partnership program with private sector to achieving sanitation solution is a vibrant approach that is exploring often neglected critical parts of sanitation value chain in Africa, disposal, recycle and reuse. It focuses on improving the health indicators of the residents through safe sanitation practice, reduce annual budget of the municipal on sanitation, increase private sector’s participation and earnings, and increase the capacity of the relevant government’s institution on the concept of sanitation marketing. The design and implementation approach is a concrete fulfillment of SDG 6: Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all. 

  

14. Mezitli, Turkey

Mezitli Women Producers Market

Mezitli Metropolitan Municipality is a fast-growing city in Mersin region of Turkey. It has a population of 187,536 and a 2.87% annual growth. Since 2014, Mezitli has been implementing a women’s empowerment initiative that is anchored in a women-only market. The municipality has experienced rapid population growth due to internal migration as well as an influx of people from neighbouring Syria. This led to the need for economic projects as well as an inclusive approach to mitigate poverty as well as potential conflict. In this context, improving women’s access to economic opportunities was identified as a priority.

Traditionally, women in the region have tended to be economically dependent on male relatives and husbands. This leads to lack of confidence and inability to make many life choices independently. Options for productive activities are often limited by lack of capital as well as an administrative environment that discourages women.

The women-only market is free (no fees) which makes entry easy for women. A wide range of products is sold, including farm produce from neighbouring rural areas as well as traditional handicrafts. Having a women-only market brings into one space women from different ethnic, educational and socio-economic backgrounds. This promotes exchange and mutual support that build women’s confidence. The market is also used to organize women, educate them on production and marketing practice as well as informing them of their rights and encouraging them to participate in public life.

Since the initial model market started in 2014, seven more markets have been opened and the intention is to eventually have a women-only market in each of the 40 sub-districts of Mezitli. The municipality is also working on forming a women producers’ cooperative that will be in charge of organizing the market.

This initiative is selected for its multi-pronged approach to gender equality and social inclusion. By providing a dedicated space for women to take part in economic activities outside the home, the initiative has raised women’s, and families’ economic status, empowered women to participate in public life and enhanced social cohesion.

This initiative responds to SDG 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls and Target 8 of SDG 11: Support positive economic, social and environmental links between urban, peri-urban and rural areas.

  

15. New York, United States

Global Vision | Urban Action

New York City is the most populous and most densely populated city in the United States with an estimated population of 8.6 million distributed over a land area of about 784 square kilometers. A global power city, NYC exerts significant impact upon commerce, research, education, and politics. It is the headquarters of the United Nations, making it an important center for international diplomacy.

Taking bold, cross-cutting action at the local and global level, NYC, through Global Vision l Urban Action, is now the first city in the world to report directly to the United Nations on local progress in achieving the SDGs.

The Sustainable Development Goals are the common international roadmap for the transition to sustainable development. Multi-stakeholder mobilization is key to the success of the SDGs and cities are at the frontline of implementation.

Although some cities do report on local implementation of the SDGs as part of a national framework, the United States has thus far not submitted a Voluntary Local Review (VLR).

The VLR was artfully adapted from OneNYC, the city’s sustainable development strategy. By tapping into existing NYC efforts, the VLR is avoiding what could have been seen as an unnecessary on local agencies.

The TC has awarded high marks to this proposal for providing an important, cross-cutting and innovative mechanism and a tool to engage with other cities and stakeholders to demonstrate the critical role that cities play in achieving the SDGs.

This proposal most strongly correlates with Goal 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe resilient and sustainable and Goal 17: Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development.